The Christmas version of traditional Italian Tiramisù

tiramisù-brulè-e-miele

I know, I know, Tiramisu is one of those untouchable Italian desserts that everyone loves. Italians love it so much it can be considered a true religion and those who try to modify the original tiramisù recipe are often badly looked at.
Tiramisù is a dessert that you can eat all year long. It’s perfect for the summer, but also in winter. And the Italians that say they’ve never eaten it for breakfast are lying.
But if you are looking for a delicious dessert to serve at Christmas, this Tiramisu with mulled wine and honey is the one for you.

You have to understand that in Italy there’s a war going on about the true birthplace of the Tiramisù. Some say it was born in Treviso, near Venice, but in Friuli Venezia Giulia, my region, are sure it was originally created in Tolmezzo. A small city in the alpine region of Carnia.
Our Tiramisù was created by Norma, the cook of Hotel Roma, in the 50s. Her recipe consisted of a cream made with egg yolks, sugar, and mascarpone cheese layered with coffee-dipped savoiardi ladyfinger biscuits.

I will not dwell on the origins of Tiramisù here the recipe for this Christmas version of tiramisu, however, seems more Friulian than the original. Because it combines wine with spices and because it recalls the typical flavors of Austria and Slovenia that greatly influence the cuisine of Friuli Venezia Giulia.

Why I love Tiramisu with mulled wine and honey

If I had to give it, I would give to Christmas the flavor of this tiramisu. It reminds me of the winter afternoons in December when it gets dark early and the markets appear in the city. On the sills of the kiosks, along with the decorations, steaming pots full of mulled wine emerge, the scent of which can be smelled meters away.
Digestive biscuits soaked in mulled wine, combined with the warm flavor of honey, give it the aftertaste of a tea or hot milk in front of the fireplace.

A different Christmas dessert than usual that will fill your heart.

Ingredients for 4 people

For the mulled wine

  • 250 ml of red wine (I use Refosco or Cabernet)
  • 50 g of sugar
  • 1 orange peel
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • Ground cinnamon to taste
  • Nutmeg powder to taste

For the cream

  • 120ml of milk
  • 250ml of fresh cream
  • 4 yolks
  • Sugar
  • 120g of mascarpone

Digestive biscuits

Method

First, make the cream as you will need to give it time to cool.
Heat the milk and cream with half a cinnamon stick. If you like, you can also add a little powder to intensify the taste. Remove from heat and dilute with honey.

mix-panna-latte-cannella
panna-cannell-miele

Separately whip the egg yolks with 2 tablespoons of sugar and incorporate the mix of milk and honey. Transfer the mixture to a saucepan and cook over low heat until the cream thickens.
Let it cool down.

uovo-sbattuto per tiramisù
crema-tiramisù e miele

In the meantime, make the mulled wine. Bring the wine to a boil with 50g of sugar. Add the orange peel and the other half of the cinnamon stick. Simmer for 5 minutes then leave to cool.

vin-brulè

Whip the mascarpone and add it to the cream when it is lukewarm.

Distribute the preparations in 4 bowls or glasses alternating the digestive biscuits soaked in mulled wine with the cream. Transfer the bowls to the fridge and leave to solidify for at least 4 hours.

Serve with a sprinkle of cinnamon.

tiramisù-brulè-e-miele

Do you want to discover more recipes?

Elena Feresin

Categories: Food

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